How to be a life-long success as a CEO Artist – lessons from startups

How to be a life-long success as a CEO Artist – lessons from startups

One thing that most artists want more than selling their artwork is to be able to show their works in the gallery(or galleries) of their choice don’t consider that their reputation as an artist must be built first.   “Success is the sum of small efforts – repeated day in and day out.” – Robert Collier   Contrary to other markets, products or services, what an artist offers can hardly be judged at the first glance. We tend to consider an artist or artwork as “good” if other curators, collectors, critics, etc. judged it as such before we did. The sum of all of these feedbacks are known as micro-reputations, and they make the real reputation of an artist.Just because 100 people like your artwork doesn’t mean that they will buy it. Even if 100 people are buying your artwork, which is great, it still doesn’t mean that you’re a confirmed artist and can exhibit in the next biennale. And if you reach the point of exhibiting in the next biennale, there is no guarantee that you’re career is assured, you will forever sell, you’re prices will touch the 6-7 figures or that all the institutions will run behind you. But if you achieve all of this or at least some part of it in the long-term, then it DOES mean that you are approaching the dream!   What nobody teaches you in school   Let’s begin from the very beginning: art school, art academy or any kind of artistic education. Contrary to all other educational paths, when you’re studying art, you learn practically nothing without your own will....
How to Write an Art Press Release – Sell Firstly Your Art Through Words

How to Write an Art Press Release – Sell Firstly Your Art Through Words

A complete guide to writing an effective press release There are some clear rules when it comes to writing press releases — covering everything from news angles to structure.  Before you write and issue a press release, ask “Is there news value in this story? And, “Does it warrant a release?” Too often organisations feel obliged to write press releases using material that is not newsworthy. Fact: if the journalist does not consider it newsworthy, it won’t get coverage. Your aim is to get coverage and raise awareness among your target audiences. There are key elements that a journalist looks for in a story — and the human interest angle is key. Do you have a human interest angle, and can you show that your news has an impact on people? Once you have decided that you have a story to tell, you need to draft your release abiding by very clear rules. These rules are designed to make it as easy as possible for journalists to use your material. What should go into a press release? Answer the following questions about your news: Who? Who are the key players — your company, anyone else involved with the product? Who does your news affect/who does it benefit? What? What is new? Why? Why is this important news — what does it provide that is different? Where? Where is this happening/is there a geographical angle/is the location of business relevant? When? What is the timing of this? Does this add significance? How? How did this come about? As a starting point, writing down the answers to these questions can be...
Art – Does it pay for you, or do you pay for it?

Art – Does it pay for you, or do you pay for it?

Art is a product of what a person imagines, feels, perceives, and depicts. It is not a story of today’s era, but of times immemorial. Art prevailed even when mankind was first born on this earth. The pots, sculptures, statues, and paintings on the walls of the caves are proof of how creative man has always been. In today’s world, the purpose of art is different in everyone’s life. If you are unsure of what it means to you, give us a chance to bring you out of this dilemma. There are people who spend their time doing what fascinates them, be it painting, writing, experimenting with new dishes in the kitchen, and so on. They do it for their own inner peace and satisfaction. It rejuvenates them. They may spend some money to fulfill this interest of theirs, but they do not expect that money to come back to them in any form. Such persons use art as their hobby. They are not very loud about their talent. In fact, some close friends and family members are their only audiences. They use their art to escape from the pressures of their everyday life. On the other hand, there are those people who are well known in society for their talent. They invest money into their art and expect huge returns by exhibiting their talent in front of the world. Their fans are not limited to the four walls of their house, but are spread over larger boundaries. They devote all their time to their art so that it reaches a vast audience. They build their own personal brand...
Learn to Sell Your Art and Create Your Brand

Learn to Sell Your Art and Create Your Brand

Role of PR and Marketing For Artists As an artist, your job doesn’t simply end with producing a great work of art. That’s actually where your work starts. It is one thing if you are pursuing art just to gratify your creative bent, but it is a different matter when you are pursuing art to carve a highly successful career, reach larger audiences, and obtain your desired recognition. This requires effort and additional skills in order to achieve a competitive edge. Your art needs a message, a strong story that is told in an unbelievable manner to make an impact. To make art that both compels and flourishes, you require skills that only a strong PR and marketing agency can offer. All successful artists market their work diligently and understand that they need to make their art profitable. They don’t wait to get discovered; instead, they discover ways to place their art in front of the right audience. They also understand that they cannot do it alone. That’s why they hire good firms to get all the marketing and PR things done in an effective manner. This lets them concentrate whole-heartedly on their art and creativity. You must understand that a PR firm and their expertise will get your art into the limelight it deserves. PR and marketing is a full-time job. It includes careful planning, well-crafted strategies, and creative messages. And it is rare for an artist to have all of this in combination with artistic talent. PR firms know how to bridge the communication gap between you and your customers, write persuasive messages for media outlets, create effective...
8 Express Hints When Writing an Art Press Release

8 Express Hints When Writing an Art Press Release

1.    Always format, write and place the most important information first and then with each additional paragraph in the body of the press release add information that is less important than the paragraph above it. 2.    Your title should be an indication that the press release is genuinely newsworthy and interesting. 3.    Every press release should contain a “News Hook” to capture the reader’s attention. 4.    The title and the introduction paragraphs are the most important parts of the press release. This section may determine whether anyone reads the press release at all. Read and rewrite until it is concise and interesting copy. 5.    Always be accurate in your facts. Do not exaggerate any of your claims. 6.    Always try to be brief and to the point when writing. 7.    Always spell check your copy prior to printing or emailing your copy. 8.    If you are not a good writer then have someone who is a good writer read, proof, edit and spellcheck for you.   You liked our article it? Share it with your...
How PR Took the Art World

How PR Took the Art World

“That was covered on Perez Hilton,” PR agent Michelle Finocchi announced proudly to The Observer. She wasn’t talking about a Kim Kardashian marriage breakup or wardrobe mishap but was instead referring to an artwork, Lindsay Lohan, a short film by artist Richard Phillips, which debuted last June on the Gagosian Gallery YouTube channel and at the Venice Biennale, before getting picked up by the tabloids—all part of Ms. Finocchi’s plan. We’d called Ms. Finocchi to ask her about PR’s incursion into the art world. Yes, PR. Before going further, let’s get the bite-the-hand-that-feeds-us stuff out of the way: this is an article about publicists and the art world. Now more than ever, PR controls access (or at least tries to) in the art world—when journalists know things, how we know things, whether or not we get to know things in the first place. We wanted to take a look at how that became the case; in what follows we’re not biting the hand that feeds us. We’re just, you know, examining it. PR is an old industry, but it’s a relatively new phenomenon in the art world. In the mid-1990s, art PR was almost nonexistent, save for large general practice firms like Ruder Finn (which had arts divisions that handled mostly institutional clients like museums) and some burgeoning agencies like Fitz & Co. For comEven firms that have exclusively worked with museums and other nonprofits are now getting calls from the commercial side. “Six months ago, we would get one to two calls a month from galleries, artists and website entrepreneurs,” said David Resnicow, of Resnicow Schroeder, whose clients...